Photo

categorization of citations according to the journals in which citations appear, such as insurance

have probably published in other risk and insurance journals that are not WOS-listed.

However, even with this limitation in mind, it is unlikely that any scholar who specializes

in risk and insurance (not including actuarial science here) does not view the JRI as

among the top few outlets for their research. In short, as stated in the introduction, the

purpose of our study is not to identify the most influential risk and insurance scholars,

even if such an undertaking were possible. One potential avenue for future research to

address some limitations of our study is an author citation analysis based on the four

“elite” RMI journals—the JRI, JRU, IME, and Geneva Review.

14 In sum, we think our

study has provided a unique and insightful analysis of the leading JRI authors as an

important point of departure for future studies in this area.

REFERENCES

Browne, M. J., 2003, Risk Management and Insurance Research: 1980–2002, Risk Man-

agement and Insurance Review, 6(1): 1-6.

Chan, K. C., and K. Liano, 2009, Influential Articles, Journals, and Institutions in Risk

Management and Insurance, Risk Management and Insurance Review, 12(1): 125-139.

Colquitt, L. L., 1997, Relative Significance of Insurance and Actuarial Journals and Arti-

cles: A Citation Analysis, Journal of Risk and Insurance, 64(3): 505-527.

Colquitt, L. L., 2003, An Analysis of Risk, Insurance, and Actuarial research: Citations

from 1996 to 2000, Journal of Risk and Insurance, 70(2): 315-338.

Colquitt, L. L., R. E. Dumm, and S. G. Gustavson, 1998, Risk and Insurance Research

Productivity: 1987–1996, Journal of Risk and Insurance, 65(4): 711-741.

Colquitt, L. L., D. W. Sommer, and W. L. Ferguson, 2009, A Citation Analysis of Risk,

Insurance, and Actuarial Research: 2001 through 2005, Journal of Risk and Insurance,

76(4): 933-953.

14 Given the current structure of the WOS database, as available to researchers, citation data are

mostly hand collected. For example, the WOS database does not provide summary citation

data by author leaving out self-citations. Also, the WOS database does not allow for automated

categorization of citations according to the journals in which citations appear, such as insurance,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button